The Garden Blog

The Ancients

The Garden is open again and we’re all looking forward to seeing visitors back, and they’ll be back in time to catch the optimism of spring throughout the displays. Tulips in the Mediterranean, magnolias in the family beds and ruffled new leaves clambering out of buds and stretching into action. They’ll also see carpets of flowers that we didn’t plant, they were here before the Botanic Garden and maybe before whatever was before the Botanic Garden; they’re Anemone nemerosa otherwise known as wood anemones. (more…)

Let’s hear it for the artists.

Walled by Alice Maltby, Voluntary Marketing and Publicity Officer, University of Bristol Botanic Garden

Toni Burrows, The Arches fox.

Sculpture is alive and well during lockdown. Behind closed doors, the kilns have still been busy firing up; stained glass scored, cut and soldered; bronze statues polished and ideas for new prototypes conceived.

While most of their shows have been cancelled and the sculptors have missed the interaction with their audience, much of an artist’s life is a solitary one, so they have been able to use their time creatively.

Hopefully we shall see their new ideas next Easter (2022). However if you are racking your brains because you cannot find the ideal present, have a look at the sculptors’ websites. (more…)

The return of an old friend

After winter, the ground slowly wakes up in increments; snowdrops and hellebores in January, crocus in February. By March we’re looking up at magnolias and cherries, down at daffodils and forward to longer days and warmer temperatures. The old spring favourites quicken our heartbeat, but I’m going to talk about an understated gem at the Botanic Garden. This is a plant that I look forward to seeing every year; you could easily walk its path without noticing, as it produces flower low to the ground while everyone is looking elsewhere. One of those plants that when you’ve seen it one year you look out for it again, until it becomes like greeting an old friend who always seems happy to see you.   (more…)

March of the Magnolias

Magnolia campbellii subsp.mollicomata ‘Lanarth’.

There’s nothing like watching nature mark off the times of the year, like familiar landmarks of a train journey to a favourite place, we know we’re moving away from winter when we see magnolias flower. The last time they flowered we couldn’t have known the year we had in store until they bloomed again, but here we are a year later and there they are with a comforting familiarity that the seasons bring, but for magnolias, they’ve seen it all before. (more…)